Companies I Won’t Be Buying My Next Android Phone From

Motorola

After owning a Motorola Milestone for a while, despite impressive hardware, Motorola themselves have been very lackadaisical about providing updates – I’m pretty certain we won’t be seeing Official Gingerbread on it, even if Froyo comes sometime this year.

This wouldn’t bother me too much if it had not been for the locked bootloader. Unlike most other manufacturers, Motorola decided Open Source meant Locked Down and essential farted in the general direction of both owners and developers.

There are workarounds, but they are much more complicated for the layman to carry out than other Android phone manufacturers.

Samsung

Samsung have recently fell out of favour with me in the netbook department, but now they pull a stunt like this? Sorry Samsung, you’ve lost me, and to think people have bought your netbooks because of personal recommendations from me!

3rd Times a Charm… Linux, Wifi and Samsung N210

If you follow this blog you will know that I’ve mentioned wireless and the Samsung N210 in the past.

Kickstart Samsung N210 Wireless
Update: UNR 10.04 Wireless on Samsung N210

The first one post was the most successful blog post I’ve ever written, and judging by the number of posts in the Ubuntu forums it’s something many people struggle with constantly with this netbook.

I’ve found that the solutions I posed previously worked, but had to be redone each time after a kernel update. What’s worse is that with each new ‘Buntu distro upgrade, an entirely new wireless problem appeared.

To be quite frank, I’m getting sick of this and I won’t be touching another Samsung netbook. In fact when it comes time to refresh I’ll probably opt for a System 76 box.

The latest upgrade appears to be finding the card and connecting seamlessly on live distro and install… but after a while of being online, it starts to drop off, becoming more frequent until it either doesn’t work at all, or it pretends to connect to the network without actually establishing any connection to the router.

I did a bit more digging in the forums and online and after much reading I’ve come to the conclusion that it has something to do with Canonical disabling Wireless N by default in 10.10 (Maverick), and whatever is going on inside Samsung netbooks… because to my dismay I discovered it’s not just the N210 that has this problem seems to be the majority of their netbook range using Realtek cards.

It was then that I stumbled across a German blog post from a link through a forum for sorting out wireless on the Samsung N510.

Dirk Hoeschen has put together both a driver and script to easily run from the command line which I can confirm worked on my N210. The only issue I’ve found is Wireless still drops but it’s much more stable and lasts longer. Furthermore, by running the script again it performs a ‘reset’ and causes the wireless to reboot without having to reboot.

sudo apt-get install build-essential
tar -xpf rtl819Xe.tar.gz
cd rtl819Xe
sudo ./install.sh

It’s not perfect but it works and so it is my 3rd solution from Ubuntu 10.10 onwards. There may be more elegant and more permanent solutions but I really don’t have the time or skill level to look for them. One thing I will state is that Ubuntu was the only distro I tested that recognised the Realtek hardware out-of-the-box despite these issues.

I honestly don’t know what the Narwhal will bring and if I’ll have to hunt for a new solution or if it will finally be fixed. Funnily enough, I did have duel boot with Win 7 Starter on the netbook and one evening when I was getting particularly fed up I booted in and found that Windows didn’t recognise the wireless network either – leading me to believe that the wireless cards in these things are very poor quality. Either that or Samsungs quality control efforts are seriously questionable. But that’s another story.

Installing Updates… Windows vs Linux

Ever installed an old Operating System from fresh? Ever tried installing all the required updates in one go? It’s a necessity for some corporate environments and for consultants we can’t just grab the latest build from IT services.

Here’s what happens when you install an outdated Linux distro:

  1. Click Update Manager
  2. “You have 217 Updates”
  3. Click Update All
  4. “The system needs to restart to update the Kernel”
  5. Restart………
  6. Click Update Manager
  7. “Your system is up to date!”

Here’s what happens when you install an outdated Windows OS:

  1. Click Windows Update
  2. “You have 48 Important Updates and 13 Optional Updates”
  3. Click Install Updates
  4. “Windows needs to restart to apply updates”
  5. Restart………
  6. Click Windows Update
  7. “You have 17 Important Updates and 2 Optional Updates”
  8. Click Install Updates
  9. “Windows needs to restart to apply updates”
  10. Restart………
  11. Click Windows Update
  12. “You have 4 Important Updates”
  13. Click Install Updates
  14. “Windows needs to restart to apply updates”
  15. Restart………
  16. Click Windows Update
  17. “You have 2 Important Updates and 2 Optional Updates”
  18. Click Install Updates
  19. “Windows needs to restart to apply updates”
  20. Restart………
  21. Click Windows Update
  22. “You have 7 Important Updates and 2 Optional Updates”
  23. Click Install Updates
  24. “Windows needs to restart to apply updates”
  25. Restart………
  26. Click Windows Update
  27. “You have 5 Important Updates”
  28. Click Install Updates
  29. “Windows needs to restart to apply updates”
  30. Restart………
  31. Click Windows Update
  32. “You have 1 Important Update and 4 Optional Updates”
  33. Click Install Updates
  34. “Windows needs to restart to apply updates”
  35. Restart………
  36. Click Windows Update
  37. “You have 3 Optional Updates”
  38. (HURRAY MUST BE NEARLY FINISHED)!
  39. Click Install Updates
  40. “Windows needs to restart to apply updates”
  41. Restart………
  42. Click Windows Update
  43. “You have 7 Important Updates and 1 Optional Update”
  44. Click Install Updates
  45. “Windows needs to restart to apply updates”
  46. Restart………
  47. Click Windows Update
  48. “You have 5 Important Updates”
  49. (BANG HEAD AGAINST WALL)!
  50. ………

….Ad Infinitum.

New Green Hornet Trailer

I first saw this advertised at a Cinema in Germany, so I had to do a double-take as I knew the Green Arrow is coming out. Finally, it’s being advertised in the UK and looks like it would be worth checking out, especially if GA doesn’t hold up to the hype.

(You may have to disable adblock to see it)

The Psychology of Ownership

It must be worth something?!Recently I got a new work laptop with Windows 7 and Microsoft Office Professional 2010 installed. Along with the laptop I got a Product Key Card for MS Office Professional 2010 to activate the license.

I am old enough to remember the days MS Office was sold in larger boxes on CDs and DVDs. What happened? I slid out the plastic inner case and opened it to find a card with the product key printed on it. I entered this into the setup screen on my new laptop and MS Office (already pre-installed) was activated right away.

Then I noticed that inside the cover of the slightly slimmer box, Microsoft has taken liberty to print some waffle about the environment – perhaps to infer this is the reason for no longer supplying a disc and using less packaging.

“Of course! What a great idea to reduce packaging! What’s your problem?” I hear you cry.

Well, simply this… why have such bulky unecessary packaging at all? One product key, 25 numbers – and this requires a pamphlet size card inside a plastic box, inside a cardboard box?! Surely, if they were concerned about the environment they could just ship these keys on credit cards? They’d also save a fortune in shipping fees. In fact, why bother shipping credit cards at all – why not just have customers log into your website, make a payment and download the software direct?

Microsoft Office Professional Edition 2010 costs ~$300, that’s ~£300 when you convert the dollar amount (US products are on a 1:1 currency conversion with the UK – think I’m joking – google it).

OpenOffice.org, or it’s successor LibreOffice, on the other hand is free. You just go to the website and download it for free. So are a number of other office productivity suites such as Lotus Symphony and Google Docs.

Imagine if you could simply log into an app store and download Office and had to pay a whopping £300 for it? Maybe some would pay, many would pirate as they do now, and maybe some would go to one of the free alternatives. After a while, the free alternatives would probably become a lot more attractive and popular.

But this is not the case with MS Office, or rather it is the case because when you pay £300 for MS Office, you get a case. Not a credit card, not a piece of paper with 25 numbers on it, not web access to download an app – a case. It’s a pretty case too, it looks nice and expensive. It reminds you how expensive it is with the aid of some nice graphics on the back. It makes you feel like you actually bought and own something – not that you downloaded it – even though you did (unless they were nice enough to pre-install).

How much do you think Microsoft Office, the app suite, is really worth? £150? £100? £50?… £20? Subtract that from £300 and you have the price you paid to own a pretty box.

And if you think I’m talking rubbish, just consider you’d pay upwards of £15 for CD with just 10 songs (only 2 of which you liked) only 10 years ago. Ditching CD boxes, separating tracks and online distribution changed all this.

This Year I Have Mostly Been Setting Up Forwarders…

Yeah, I can’t believe I haven’t done this before, either but now I’ve learned my lesson. I’ve elected to start off the new year by cleaning up my inbox – that means unsubscribing from services that I don’t use or read and also switching current services to a temporary email address through this domain.

The beauty is by using custom email addresses e.g. custom(at)wafitz.net I can later check and see who is selling my data to spammers. I also have an effective way of removing myself from mailing lists where unsubcribing is discouraged by stealth.

The very worst offender I have found appears to be http://www.advfn.com/.  I signed up to this website a long time ago to some financial info and it automatically added me to a dozen or so email subscriptions. Subsequent attempts to unsubscribe led to a weird non-functioning webpage that wouldn’t let me remove myself. Emails to their support go unanswered.

So I do the next best thing with ADVFN – I tell Google that their emails are spam. I mark all their emails as spam. Hopefully, if enough people find themselves in the same position as me do this, all of their email service will automatically be considered by Google as spam and they may then have incentive to change.

I do this with any services where they make it a difficult hurdle to unsubscribe. Just mark their email address as a spammer with as many email services as possible – if enough people do this – it will have an effect.