Copy Files to Pogoplug Without The Pogo Software (using scp)

I recently picked up a Pogoplug on sale from John Lewis and thought I’d give it a whirl with my media.

Although it is a neat little device, one of it’s biggest benefits is also it’s biggest flaw in terms of design – and that is how it requires you to sign into pogoplug.com and maintain an account there. It also requires you to mount the pogoplug with their software for transferring and viewing files, rather than acting as a NAS.

Whilst it’s nice to have easy access to media outside of home (without having to fiddle with setting up port forwarding on your firewall and whatnot) it’s a bit of a drag when you’re on your own network. I noticed a severe performance degradation copying media to my pogoplug device using pogoplugfs rather than through a standard means. So I learned that Pogoplug does appear to have a Busybox install and along with that SSH access. In order to enable SSH access, Cloud Engines have been gracious enough to allow this through your my.pogoplug.com portal. You simply go to Security options and enable SSH, and change the password. From there it’s just a simple,

ssh root@<pogoplugIpAddress>

The problem is that there doesn’t seem to be any support for sftp and therefore I couldn’t use ssh in a file manager. Thankfully however ssh provides scp protocol and from there it was just as short script in order to zap files across over local lan without worrying about signing in.

When you attach an external harddrive to the Pogoplug, your files will be installed in a directory similar to ‘/tmp/.cemnt/mnt_sda2/’ where ‘mnt_sda2’ will be the mount point of your media device.

Be aware this script utilises “expect”, but you could use private keys instead.

ppsend.sh:
#!/bin/bash
#set -x
# Provide a list of media extensions to send to pogoplug
extensions=("mp4" "avi" "mkv" "jpg");
ppip="192.168.1.10" # The local ip address of your pogoplug
echo ""
echo "Sending video files to PogoPlug ($ppip) for the following extensions..."
for ext in "${extensions[@]}"; do
echo ${ext}
done
echo ""
for ext in "${extensions[@]}"; do
 expect -c "spawn bash -c \"scp -p *.$ext root@$ppip:/tmp/.cemnt/mnt_sda2/\"
 expect assword ; send \"mysshpassword\r\"; interact"
done

I think the next step for this is to translate it to another language and wrap it up in a GUI for easy access. So watch this space perhaps.

3gp Video Format on Linux

I don’t know about you, but it irritates me how many mobile phones I’ve used that only save their video in one propriety format – 3gp. From what I gather 3gp is a format backed by 3GPP – a collaboration of telecoms providers – probably for it’s compact size limit (for sending MMS) but why then can’t they offer another encoding version for video you don’t intend to send?

3gp doesn’t work out of the box on Linux – but I’ve found even with restricted media packages in place that the audio won’t play. Google “3gp audio” and a myriad of results will return with links to free converters. Support for linux seems to range from either some fairly complex command line fu, to manually installing and compiling codecs for working in your media player of choice.

Which is why I was happy to discover Miksoft a little while ago. Miksoft offer a free ‘Mobile Media Converter’ which is not only cross-platform, but it offers a simple GUI interface. The GUI makes it a trivial matter to copy a 3gp (or any media file) you want into the input box, then just specify the output file and the format you wish (e.g. AVI).

I’ve found Mobile Media Converter converts sound perfectly and it also includes a YouTube downloader which I’ve found handy recently.

Get Mobile Media Converter now (and be sure to donate if you have any spare cash).

Bookshelf: The Men Who Stare at Goats

The Men Who Stare at Goats I was a little curious when I saw the title of the movie come out and when I spotted this book on sale I decided to pick it up and satisfy my curiosity.

As it is, I’ve now read the novel before the movie, in fact I’ve only watched half the movie so far. For what it’s worth I don’t think the movie does this book justice at all! In fact the movie is less an adaption of the novel and more of a poor tribute to it.

There’s just so much detail left out and from what I’ve watched so far, it’s really treated entirely as a comedy with little care or attention paid towards the serious, more saddening side. Of course I’ve only seen half so all that may change towards the end of the film, but where I left it just seemed to be getting nowhere near the darker side of the novel.

As for the book, the book is fascinating, immersing, funny and tragic all at the same time. The author carefully leads us through interviews and historical events, offering background and explanation to the occasional bizarre moments that leaked into mainstream press and public consciousness. It also shows a darker, sinister side to the lighter, much joked about moments such as the leaking of torture using Barney the Purple Dinosaur.

Linking all of these events and bizarre military strategies is something that sounds like the plot of a badly concieved B-movie. The First Earth Battalion, brain-child of and army man gone native hippy taking inspiration from the peace movement of the 70’s. The author, Jon Ronson carefully lays out how something that started out as a thought experiment in creating a US army of peaceful warrior monks – bringing love and peace to the conflict zones – became so twisted and corrupted, ending with something a bit like Saw franchise meets X-Files.

Of course, it’s hard to touch on so much material and cover-ups without eventually succumbing to a conspiratorial tone, and towards the end of the book, as the author runs out of leads, there is a slight leaning towards speculation. It doesn’t detract from the novel in any way and after everything else that’s been presented, it doesn’t feel that far reaching. However, it does leave an small opening for sceptics to question the research and sources.

Nevertheless, I felt enlightened after reading the book, since there are so many references to real and tangible historical events, it really makes sense of it all from an inside perspective. It certainly makes you more media aware when looking out for those occasional blunders that make it into the spotlight.

The Men Who Stare at Goats totally belongs on your must-read list, click on the link to buy it now at Amazon.co.uk!